Center for Louisiana Studies Archival Catalog

This searchable database provides information on images, documents, and audio and video recordings, made between 1934 and the present.

Interview with Dickie Landry by Michael Tisserand

Accession No.: 
TI1-101

Former Accession # TI1-015

0:00 Dickie talks about recording at Master Tracks with Paul Simon (Graceland) and problems with the band members in the studio. He told John Hart that the studio was ready to call the project quits but they could record one more song. Buckwheat and Terrance Simeon and Dopsie were in the studio. Paul ended up taking choosing Dopsie for the record.
5:26 The project started when Dickie was in New York working on a Loni Anderson film. They went to see Beausoleil who was performing at Carnegie Recital Hall. He introduces himself to Paul Simon. Paul was looking for a Zydeco band and Dickie told him Buckwheat was playing that night at Tramp's. Paul liked what he heard and called Dickie the next morning and told him to find him two more bands and a studio and he'd come down and record. Paul invited Dickie to his studio that night to hear what he was working on with Ladysmith Black Mambazo. They became friends and working on the project together.
11:30 Dickie talks about Paul Simon's philanthropy and contributing to health care for the underprivileged. Paul came to town to do a benefit at the Cajundome for a children's organization.
12:30 Dickie says that Dopsie played a show for $3k and only paid his band members $50 each but signed away his rights to points on the album. When the album hit, Dickie was accused of taking all the money from the band but he says he didn't make any money at all. He talks about confronting Dopsie about the accusation and Dopsie's later lawsuit against Paul for copyright infringement which he and Ann Savoy believed to be bogus. Ann Savoy ended up finding the first recording of the song from around 1917. Ahmet Ertegun signed Dopsie to Atlantic. Bob Dylan asked Dopsie to play but he couldn't do it.
17:50 Dopsie didn't have a manager at that time. Dickie says Dopsie had a bad reputation especially after crowning himself king after Clifton died.
19:40 Dickie's first involvement with Zydeco was when he first played with Clifton in 1972 in Breaux Bridge at a club called the Dixie Doodle just after Clifton had filmed 'Hot Pepper'. In 1978, a wealthy family in New York with whom Dickie was acquainted, decided to fund a tribute to the blues at Carnegie Hall and they contacted Dickie to advise. He recommended and insisted that Clifton Chenier be part of the show. The show sold out. Dickie tells the story about Ertegin pressuring the producer to add Chicago blues musicians and the problems that ensued. Clifton's performance saved the show at the end.
27:57 Dickie was having a drink with the bass player Jumpin Joe in a bar before the show. Joe told him he couldn't read or write but ever since he was a kid he dreamt of playing Carnegie Hall.
29:38 Danny Kimble, a local rubboard player, can imitate Cleveland Chenier's playing. Cleveland would use four bottle openers on each finger to get his sound. Dickie tells a story about smoking marijuana with Cleveland.
32:25 Dickie tells the story of Dopsie turning down Saturday Night Live. Dickie tells the story of his 40th birthday in L.A. playing a concert with Phillip Glass. Some people threw him a surprise party and Mick Jagger was there. Mick Jagger went with Dickie to hear Clifton Chenier play at a high school in Watts.
39:00 Dickie says he's the one who brought Zydeco music to New Orleans and gave the idea for the name The Big Easy for the film starring Ellen Barkin and Dennis Quaid which Dickie consulted on. Dickie managed Terrance Simien for five years until Terrance married his wife Cynthia who took control of Terrance's career. He talks about he and Paul Simon going to see Terrance at the Lone Star. David Bowie, Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger and Penny Marshall were there to see another act. Dickie got Terrance a record deal with a label in L.A. but the label went bankrupt.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Cajun Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:28:32
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview of Rosie and Morris Ledet by Michael Tisserand

Accession No.: 
TI1-103

Former Accession # TI1-016

1:00 They talk about Rosie being in heavy rotation on the radio, especially from Lafayette to Lake Charles. Rosie says she wasn't a big fan of Zydeco growing up. She started liking it after hearing Boozoo play at Richard's one night when she was a teenager with her uncle. Her parents listened to Zydeco but no one in her family plays music. Rosie listened to a lot of rock and roll and talks about the musicians she likes listening to. She talks about the night she saw Boozoo at Richard's. Morris sat in that night on accordion playing songs by Amede Ardoin and that's how he got his start. Jealous Man Two-Step. That night was the first night Rosie and Morris met. They got married the next year. He had a band for four years before she ever picked up the accordion.
8:40 They tell a story about Morris telling Rosie not to mess with his accordion while he was gone. Rosie played 'Morning Train' for him after she had been practicing on her own. They went on tour (Morris Ledet & the Zydeco Playboys) in the summer of 1993 and Rosie would play with the band some of the time. By 1994, Rosie was in the band full-time and Morris moved to the bass. Rosie recorded her first album that year.
11:49 They talk about Queen Ida and Ann Goodly being the other women accordion players in Zydeco. Rosie says some of the older people feel like women shouldn't play.
16:30 Rosie says she has a reputation for being shy, but she's not like that on stage. Morris says her change on stage is like night and day.
20:40 Rosie's given name is Mary Rosezla Bellard. She was born in Church Point and brought up in Eunice. Morris was born and raised in Iota, La where he works at the high school as a janitor. They say Beau Jocque is their biggest influence. She says basically Zydeco is revved up blues. Morris started playing his second year in high school when he found one in the band room. The first song he learned to play was Terrence Simien's 'Hee Haw Breakdown'. He learned to play by ear. His dad had an accordion but was a blues harmonica player. He plays rubboard with the band. Morris manages the band. They talk about how the band makes business decisions.
27:10 They just moved to their new home and talk about how they've been taking care of Morris' parents for the past several years. Rosie's family is very supportive. She says her mom is her number one fan. They talk about Rosie's first songs that she wrote.
33:30 Rosie talks about her parents speaking French but Rosie doesn't speak it well because her parents discouraged her from speaking it but now she's trying to learn from her parents.
36:30 There are younger people in the crowds now. She feels like Zydeco is popular with the younger crowd because of people like Beau Jocque and Boozoo putting rock into the music. Zydeco has brought the community together. Morris wishes they were on the road more and they are playing a venue in Los Angeles called the Alligator Lounge and the Foothill Club in Long Beach.
39:28 They talk about how local people don't like musicians to change Zydeco and add outside influences. She likes to write about everyday stuff. She mentions her favorite songs that she wrote and songs that other Zydeco musicians have written.
45:00 Rosie used to be terrified of Mardi Gras. She talks about what it was like for her during Mardi Gras as a kid.
48:30 They are working on songs for the next album. Rosie plays at home for her daughter, Cassandra, and at her daughter's school. Rosie talks about being a fan of Koko Taylor. They talk about rivalries in the Zydeco scene.
55:20 They talk about working with Rockin Sidney and how much he has taught them. Lake Charles and Lafayette want to hear the piano accordion, but the Opelousas/Lawtell area is more French accordion. Rosie loves New Orleans and all the different music.
59:00 Their band is almost all family members. Ray Johnson is starting to play guitar with them.
1:02:00 Women's roles in music and the lack of credit they get in the country.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Cajun Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Coverage Spatial: 
Iota, LA
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:02:37
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview with Anderson Moss by Michael Tisserand parts 1 and 2

Accession No.: 
TI1-116

Former Accession # TI1-019

0:00 Anderson Moss is from Maurice, LA. Earnest Henry is from Church Point and has been taking lessons from Moss every week for about two months. Moss attends church at Mother Mercy and has played church dances there. He moved to Texas in 1928 when his father went there for work. Moss says they would hire anyone from Louisiana because they were known to be hard workers.
10:30 Moss's father played harp. Moss would play washboard with him.
11:26 (He plays a song Hippy Ti Yo on the accordion) Moss is playing a Titano accordion he bought about 7 years ago.
14:21 He talks about the old house parties. People would pay about $2 or $3 to get into the house dance. Louisiana food would be served. The music ended at about 1am. News of the dances was circulated by word of mouth.
17:49 Moss says everyone in Texas misses Louisiana. There's a ward in Houston called French Town that was settled by Louisiana people.
21:07 Where he was born, there was a big hall as you cross Maurice that would have dances every two weeks. His parents would go and he'd stay home and watch his brother and sister. But after they went to sleep, he's sneak out and sit in the cotton field outside of the dance hall and listen. When it was over, he'd run back home and get under the covers so his parents didn't know. That's how he learned to play. He would hear Amede Ardoin and Bidon (Eustis Hopkins) on accordion. Sou-Pop and Belizaire Johnson were also accordion players that played at that time. He says Lonnie Mitchell was his best friend and would always pick him up to play.
29:10 Moss started playing accordion on the triple node. He learned 'Stormy Weather', 'Driftin Blues' and 'Black Gal', then people started asking him to play parties. When he couldn't play a party, he'd ask L.C. Donatto to play. He played all over Houston. Then started playing for white people in River Oaks. The white people called it swamp music or Cajun music. He talks about the River Oaks Country Club. They didn't call it Zydeco until Clifton Chenier. He said Clifton drank too much. They say Clifton drank a cheap wine called Sweet Lucy. He tells a story about Clifton trying to take a club gig out from under him.
36:14 He says he doesn't play anymore. There's a young crew playing now. Ronnie Broussard, Paul Richard. The word zydeco is from the old days. It's the word for a snap bean. The old saying was 'zydeco sont pas sale'. They talk about people dancing to zydeco. There's a dance where they act like they're snapping the beans. He talks about a dance that was so crowded with dancers the ceiling broke. He and Lonnie Mitchell were the first zydeco players out here. Clifton came after, then Danatto and a man named Willie Green that played out in the 6th ward. Willie Green was from Abbeville. Joe Jesse was another player.
44:10 Moss switched from the triple node to the big piano accordion to change things up. He says the Creole people like the button node accordion.
45:39 His doctor told him that cigarettes were good for your nerves. Moss tells stories about some rich people in town back in his day.
53:00 He talks about going to the casino in Coushatta to gamble. He said he made money playing music. He made a record a long time ago. But they threw him out and he never got his record. He talks about never getting paid for recording.
56:50 Moss talks about his time overseas in the army during WW2. He played accordion at parties in England and France.
1:10:54 His little 4-year-old nephew comes in and plays on a little accordion. Moss used to play the Continental Club when it was called Johnson's.
1:16:17 He first met Clifton in Houston. He'd go see Clifton when he was in the hospital. They talk about Lent in the old days. Musicians didn't play during Lent. Moss played with Lightnin' Hopkins.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Cajun Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Coverage Spatial: 
Houston
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:33:32
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview with Anderson Moss by Michael Tisserand part 3

Accession No.: 
TI1-117

0:00 It's unclear who they are speaking about. But it's someone who has died. Tisserand says he saw Moss Music Store and Moss Barber Shop. They belonged to some of Moss's nephews. Moss says he was good dancer. He remembers when the Charleston came out. He talks about some of the old shows he would do with all kinds of acts.
4:50 Moss says things have changed and he feels the devil is here on earth. He gets a kick out of teaching music. When he was younger and playing music, he still worked during the day doing all kinds of different jobs.
9:23 He met his wife at a Zydeco at the Junction. She was from Louisiana.
10:05 Tisserand dictates some notes to himself saying Moss was singing "Tell Me What's the Matter Now" as he was leaving. He got up to watch every car pass by. He was wearing nice shoes and shirt and red suspenders and a hat.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Cajun Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Coverage Spatial: 
Houston
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
11:04
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview with Rockin Sidney by Michael Tisserand Part 1

Accession No.: 
TI1-140

Former Accession # TI1-012

0:00 Rockin Sidney is from LeBeau, LA in St. Landry Parish. His parents were farmers. Grew up listening to hillbilly, Cajun, Rhythm and Blues, classical and jazz music on the radio. At the dancehalls they played La la/ Creole music. In every other house, someone played the accordion.
3:12 He talks about how people would play together at their houses after work. In Sidney's family, his uncle Frank Simien and his first cousins played. Johnny Henry played alto and tenor sax and the white people would pick him up to play their parties. He says all the Simeons are related going back to Paris. Sidney wrote a song about the Simeons. Both of Sidney's grandfathers played the accordion. Step grandfather related to Clifton Chenier. Guitar Gable, Gable King.
8:30 Sidney moved to Lake Charles in his 20s when he had a hit record he recorded in 1961 called 'No Good Woman'. The term Swamp Pop; was tagged onto the style of music later. Matilda. Sidney first recorded 'Tell Me' in Lake Charles. He talks about the recording business back then and playing clubs around Alexandria, Morganza and New Roads. Sidney never sang in French. He started playing because he wanted to be in movies. He'd see movies at the Palmetto Theater. He wanted to be like Roy Rogers when he was a kid. But he was disappointed when he was told he couldn't be like that because he was black. He talks about all the careers he dreamed of being growing up in Catholic school.
23:40 The white priest at Sidney's school had a talk with him about why Sidney was discouraged by his career desires and pointed out to him that he could be in the movies as an entertainer. Sidney said the priest changed his life by encouraging him and paying for his piano lessons when he was 10 or 11 years old. Father Mulkeen.
26:27 Sidney wrote 'No Good Woman' and recorded at Floyd Soileau's studio. The first record that gave Sidney some notoriety was 'She's My Morning Coffee" recorded at Goldband. J.D. Miller. His biggest hits were recorded at Floyd's. 'Toot Toot' was in 1984.
30:00 Sidney signs with Eddie Shuler. 'Lache pas la patate'. 'Action Speaks Louder Than Words'. He talks about trying to sing in French. Sidney stayed five years with Eddie.
35:05 Sidney decided to start playing the accordion. First asked Clifton Chenier if he could try his accordion at a show at Sacred Heart Church. Sidney first bought an accordion around 1976. 'Good Time Woman'. Sidney made his first Zydeco record in 1982 'Joy to the South'. Sidney had opened up a music store, Lake City Music Store, and made 'Zydeco Fever' as an 8-track. He moved to Lake Charles in 1962. His band played all over Texas and Louisiana. Lakeshore Club. Sidney talks about this time when everyone was moving to Texas and California but he didn't want to move far from LeBeau unless he had a hit record. Big Mama Thornton.
43:30 Sidney got away from the band after having troubles with the band and did a one-man show for about 12 years at places like the Candlelight Inn and different hotels.
45:40 He was writing and producing for other artists. Superior Elevation. He talks about how writing Toot Toot came about. Nobody was playing Zydeco records on the radio. He talks about Cajun phrases said from the stage. Sidney didn't understand the French words and just came up with Toot Toot from what little he gathered the musicians and crowd said at shows.
54:35 Sidney does all the parts when he records in his home studio. He talks about recording a final song for his record that ended up being Toot Toot and how he came up with the lyrics for his songs by remembering phrases he's heard.
1:02:24 Tisserand mentions C.C. Adcock looking for radio stations that were playing Toot Toot when he was a kid. This album came out on the Maison de Soul label before being released by Epic. The single for Toot Toot sold around 80k copies before being released. He talks about a lot of artists making Toot Toot popular before anyone ever heard Sidney's original version. People Magazine interviewed Sidney. Sidney recorded with John Fogerty on Fogerty's version of the song at Master Tracks in Crowley. Toot Toot was in two movies-- 'Pure Luck' starring Danny Glover and 'One Tough Cop'.
1:09:45 Sidney doesn't feel he's been done justice in books about the music scene. He says he's disappointed he wasn't in the book about Cajun music by Ann Savoy. He talks about his song and album in the billboard charts. Toot Toot paid for his radio stations. There was a beer commercial in Germany that used Toot Toot. Floyd leased the single to Epic. He talks about the song and album on the billboard charts and his royalties and publishing he split with Floyd. Toot Toot paid for the radio stations and his studio. He says he has about 6-7 songs on which he's still collecting royalties. He talks about all the different versions in different languages.
1:17:20 Sidney talks about Germany.
1:21:24 He talks about his spiritual beliefs and God's hand in his success.
1:28:00 Toot Toot lyrics

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Cajun Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Thursday, September 17, 2020
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Charles
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:33:37
Cataloged Date: 
Thursday, September 17, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, September 17, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV

Interview with Rockin Sidney by Michael Tisserand Part 2

Accession No.: 
TI1-141

Former Accession # TI1-013

0:00 Sidney tells the story of him recording Toot Toot at his home studio and asking his wife's opinion after recording all night.
5:30 They talk about Sidney's recording studio setup. He hasn't had any other players record in his studio but he has produced and worked with other players in other studios like Ann Goodly and Rosie Ledet. Sidney says he believes there are powerful ways to approach a bandstand. He said he got advice and education like this from older players.
9:23 He says he was making $500-$600/ week in high school and graduated with a brand new '58 Plymouth station wagon painted green and pink. He talks about the ways he would promote himself with his behavioral style. He said there were a lot of things he had to compete, especially because he didn't speak French. He wrote 'Joy to the South'. It was hard for him to get into Zydeco. He decided he wanted to be in Zydeco like Mohammed Ali was in boxing. He said people started to pay attention to him after he challenged the bigger acts like Clifton Chenier and Buckwheat, often at The Summit in Houston, TX.
19:00 Sidney had a white band play behind him. He talks about planning a performance for a month to get people to notice him on the Zydeco scene. Tyronne Davis, Buckwheat, Z.Z. Hill, and Clifton Chenier were all performing the night Sidney pulled his planned act out in Houston. Sidney would dress up like Clifton and also had ventriloquist act he did with a dummy of Buckwheat. He talks about his publicity stunts he learned from the older musician in New Orleans.
32:30 Sidney liked comedy and would dress up like his dad and make his twelve brothers and sisters laugh.
34:17 He would go to The Dream Room on Toulouse St. in New Orleans in the 1950s and show the musicians his pick to let them know he played guitar. The New Orleans musicians would tease him about being from the country.
37:15 Sidney's company is called Toot Toot Communications. He says his station that they are in has a lot of history, including the first black disc jockey, Bubba Lutcher. Nelly Lutcher. The show at The Summit was the Zydeco Blues Fest in 1982 or 1983. Sidney had a character he played called Josh the Pimp and he would sing the song 'Welfare Cadillac'. He had goose that he would dress up for an act in his shows. He did a 'Purple Rain' act. All those acts were before Toot Toot. He talks more about his impersonations of Clifton and Buckwheat and how hard it was to get noticed with great players like them on the scene.
49:18 Luke Collins at the radio station in Eunice said John Delafose would show up at the station within 10 minutes when he heard Sidney there. Sidney said he and John Delafose had a little competition but things were easier for Delafose and Boozoo. They talk about the money the clubs paid and the cover charges at the door and musicians competing for crowds if they played on the same night.
59:29 Sidney talks about how the shows and musicians have changed since his day. He wishes Rosie Ledet would learn some things from him about how to better her stage presence.
1:06:50 He thinks the musicians like Keith Frank and Beau Jocque should try to get along better and put aside competitions. He says he regrets doing those things in his early shows.
1:10:40 Sidney talks about producing Boozoo's 'Dog Hill'.
1:17:15 They talk about Mardi Gras and Luke Collins being the first Zydeco radio d.j. Sidney's stations are KAOK in Lake Charles and KEAZ in DeRidder.
1:27:05 Sidney, Queen Ida, and Clifton all won Grammy Awards.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Cajun Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Wednesday, February 21, 1996
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Charles
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:33:56
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview with Rockin Sidney by Michael Tisserand Part 3

Accession No.: 
TI1-142

0:00 Tisserand and Sidney are in Sidney's warehouse digging through all of the records, memorabilia and merchandise that Sidney has stored. He mentions the agency he ran, Dance and Showband Attractions, and his former agent,, Huey Meaux, with whom he was with for one year. Sidney says Huey Meax got into some trouble and is in jail now, possibly in Houston.
8:35 Sidney find the tape of the show from October 30th at The Summit in Houston for the First Annual Texas and Louisiana Blues and Zydeco Festival with Z.Z. Hill, Clifton Chenier, Lil Milton, Buckwheat, John Delafose. Sidney was billed last. He says the man who booked the show was Richard's brother-in-law.
12:30 Sidney digs through his old costumes he wore on stage. He made them himself. He's got mannequins he got from Wal-Mart to dress up as zydeco musicians for Festival City, the entertainment complex he is planning.
20:40 Sidney is the first Zydeco musician to have his own studio. He says he's the first and only Zydeco musician to make a Christmas record. He says he likes to be the first to do what people aren't doing. He likes to consider himself 20 years ahead. He talks about artists being labeled by their genres.
30:00 Sidney says his biggest goal is to help other people like the old man in New Orleans helped him. He can't remember the man's name but said that the old man is the one who started him recording. He said he made trips to New Orleans to learn from him. He remembers the man played shows with his wife and he told Sidney that he shouldn't want to be a musician but instead should be an entertainer--a star.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Cajun Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Wednesday, February 21, 1996
Coverage Spatial: 
Lake Charles
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
46:57
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview of Lil Buck and John Hart by Michael Tisserand Part 1

Accession No.: 
TI1-150

Former Accession # TI1-009

0:00 interview on road with Lil Buck.
Lil Buck, John Hart, Joe Brouchet, Robert St. Judy -- original Red Hot Louisiana Band started in 1969
1:00 Lil Buck met Clifton Chenier one night at the Blue Angel Club after Buck's rock n' roll band had broken up. Buck's uncle owned the club. Clifton asked Buck to play that night because his guitar player was stuck in Houston. After the gig, Clifton asked his bass player to pick Buck up for the rest of the gigs that weekend in Houston without even asking Buck. Buck recorded 9-10 albums with him after that over about 11 -12 years.
2:50 Buckwheat, The Hitchhikers
3:28 Lil Buck says when he left to play Zydeco, that turned everything around. he says he's the one who brought the younger people to Zydeco.
4:30 Claude Boudreaux -- Lil Buck'ss uncle that owned Blue Angel
6:05 They recall a story Clifton had told them when a black accordion player was hired to play but they thought he was white when they hired him. They made him play outside and put white gloves on him.
6:55 Clifton came up with the name Red Hot Louisiana Band. Clifton played songs in different keys often. He was creative on the bandstand trying out different things and taking chances.
11:00 They talk about how Clifton would hang out with the guys in the band during the day, but at night during the shows, he'd sit at another table planning. When together, he liked to tell and joke with the band about how hard it was in the past being on the road playing for little money or for BBQ. Buck said after the shows Clifton would take his shoes off and pour the sweat out. They'd get on the stage at 9pm and it was nonstop til 1.
15:17 Leaving CA going to Austin a week before coming back to Lafayette. Lil Buck did all the driving. An ice chest full of beer and water and snacks also had Clifton's insulin. They cleaned out the chest and accidentally threw out the insulin. Clifton's feet started to swell and he told Buck to speed to Austin. He got there and went to the doctor and got the shot and went to bed and still played the gig that night. Lil Buck says Clifton was an 'Iron Man'. They talk about other stories when Clifton was sick but kept playing. Clifton said 'whenever people are waiting for me that's where I'm gonna be'.
20:38 Etta James Buddy Guy. Buck talks about how Clifton's last name was pronounced different everywhere and how Clifton pronounced it.
22:40 Tisserand asks if Clifton or Clevland would say they invented the rub board. Buck says Clifton. Playing with Lightin' Hopkins. Buck said the way the washboard started was when Clifton worked in Port Arthur at a refinery and asked a metal worker if he could make a washboard the way he drew it. The man said he could make it any way he wanted. Ernest Johnson had been with Clif a long time and ended up playing with Buckwheat.
24:50 They'd that tour to California/Pacific NW all the way to Canada twice a year and be over there for two months. They had a few agents Big Pete (accordion player) Oakland, CA, someone named Buddy.
26:14 Helen Faulk-- Buck said she was his number one agent and Tisserand says Helen said she was his other woman so she knows him well. Buck says she used to do the driving for the band in a '59 Cadillac.
27:50 Clifton got his crown in California and also was given the key to Paris, France. There's a street named after Clifton in Paris.
29:30 Passe-partout television. Danny Caron. C.J. Sparking Paradise. C.J. replaced John Hart and Hart went on to play in Doopsie's band. Swamp party every Monday.
33:27 change to an interview with Lil Buckin Opelousas. Lil Buck says John is a master mechanic. They've been friends since before they played together in Clifton's band. John played with Little Bob on Monday nights before Lil Buck played with Clifton at the Peppermint Lounge. Lil Buck says John drinks scotch and milk.
36:15 Clifton didn't mind the band drinking as long as they could do there job. Lil Buck says Clifton used to drink heavily. Funny story about a gig in St. Martinville. Lil Buck says Clifton and Cleveland got along in the band. Cleveland was the older brother. Buck tells a story about playing the prison in San Francisco. C.J. was quiet in the band. Buck says he was with the band from 1969 to about 1982. Buck talks about Clifton becoming ill and his cousin played in his place for a gig in Galveston. His cousin was killed in a car accident on the way back to Lafayette.
41:20 Buck says the last time he saw Clifton was the night before he died. He went to the hospital with him and friends and family. The next day Buck left to play a gig in Houston and got the call that Clifton had died when he got to the motel. They announced it from the bandstand and everyone was upset. They were playing a Catholic Church in Houston.
44:10 They talk about records made with Chenier. One album was with Elvin Bishop and Steve Miller. Buck tells a funny story about kicking Elvin's pipe under the table so that he could solo.
45:47 John Hart comes in.
49:00 John Hart says Zydeco is far-fetched and says he's an authority on it. Hart is 64 years old and says you have to do research to be authentic. Clifton Chenier created it. Claude Faulk.
58:40 Hart says People are playing music and calling it Zydeco when it isn't. He says it's a fast name for a fast dollar. Talks about someone named Larry who is going to expose the truth about Zydeco and put it on the internet.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Micheal Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Creole Cajun Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Sunday, July 21, 1996
Coverage Spatial: 
Opelousas
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:33:29
Cataloged Date: 
Saturday, September 12, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Saturday, September 12, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 111

Interview of Lil Buck and John Hart by Michael Tisserand Part 2

Accession No.: 
TI1-151

Former Accession # TI1-010

0:00 They tell stories about Clifton Chenier recording with Floyd Swallow and Clifton's band traveling all over the world. The Louisiana Red Hot Band brought the blues and rhythm and blues to Zydeco. John Hurt last talked to Clifton about a month before he died. Clifton was neat and would drink VO but he'd never seem drunk. Hart and Buck say they learned a lot from Chenier. They enter a club where Buck and Hart are going to play that night.
9:15 They started playing with Clifton in the late 60s. Clifton was crowned overseas before they started playing with him. Hart talks about having been on the road with C.J. Chenier and Rockin Dopsie.
14:35 Marcel Dugas was one of the few people who would sit in with Clifton. Clifton's uncle played on an album but never in a live show. They tell a funny story Robert St. Julian told them about making that album. They talk about the way Clifton played the accordion. There's a story about going out to Opelousas to hear Buckwheat play right after they started playing with Clifton. They asked them to sit in and Clifton played Hammond organ. He played harmonica too. Lightnin' Hopkins once came to the church hall they played and sat in. They also backed Lightnin' up at The Ranch in Duson. They backed up a lot of blues acts.
20:13 They didn't know Clifton's parents but Buck says he went with Cleveland to clean the parents' grave for three or four years for All Saints Day. They mention other players who played with Clifton after their time in the band including Tee Jim, Dopsey, Milton, Raymond Monnet,, Alonzo Johnson, Danny Caron, Sherman Robinson, Wayne Burns, Katie Webster. Hurt played in Dopsey's band on Paul Simon's Graceland album recorded at J.D. Miller's studio and they talk about that experience.
25:02 Clifton used to play a dance all night Saturday night and start another dance on Sunday morning at Truman Palace. They tell a story about Cleveland getting sick on stage after drinking and eating pork chops. There's a story about an accident while the band was on the way to Holly Beach and another story about a hurricane when they were playing in Holly Beach. Buck tells a story about a show they played on Good Friday around 1971 and why they'll never play on Good Friday again. They tell more stories about troubles on the road.
34:15 There was a club called the Four Ace Club that's a janitorial service now. One whole wall of the stage was a mural of Clifton and the band. He has a friend who bought the wall and still has it. Buck's uncle, Claude Boudreaux was Clifton's first booking agent.
40:00 They talk about the show in Houston at The Summit. Buck played with Buckwheat at that time. When Clifton started to get really sick, he'd have to sit down on the shows. The last time Buck heard him play was at the festival in Plaisance. Clifton got on stage and said to play that song "I'm Coming Home" and started crying.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco Creole Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Sunday, July 21, 1996
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
44:22
Cataloged Date: 
Sunday, September 13, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Sunday, September 13, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview with Nathan Williams by Michael Tisserand Part 1

Accession No.: 
TI1-163

0:00 The beginning of the recording sound like it's something that was on a tape that Tisserand recorded over and is not part of the interview.
0:57 Interview begins here. Nathan grew up in St. Martinville. His dad was a construction worker who dies of a heart attack when Nathan was seven. His mother had to work 2-3 jobs to take care of him and his 7 brothers and sisters. His grandmother helped out and cut sugarcane and his oldest brother helped raise the kids. His mother sent them all to Catholic school. In 9th grade, Nathan hitchhiked from St. Martinville to Lafayette to stay with his brother, Sid, and has stayed in Lafayette ever since. After school everyday, he worked in his brother's store. He graduated from Northside and married his wife Nancy.
5:50 When he was in 7th or 8th grade he would go and listen to Clifton Chenier play at the Casino Club in St. Martinville. He'd listen from outside the club and sometimes get in trouble with the neighbor of the club.Clifton was the first zydeco music Nathan ever heard. Buckwheat came out when he was in high school and he would visit with Buckwheat after school and started sitting in with him at his dances.
8:15 Nathan didn't play music growing up. His brother played organ. His family was very religious. His grandmother helped out a lot as did the man who owned the construction company where his father had worked. He graduated Northside in 1983 and then got sick. Soon after, he was hospitalized for 8 months with a thyroid condition which left him with a large medical bill he has only just finished paying.
13:30 Nathan spoke French growing up. He says he sings French better than he speaks it. He talks about his family heritage. His uncle, Harry, plays guitar with C.J. He talks about having his own style and being the first zydeco musician to have a parade band play his music. It makes him proud.
19:17 Follow Me Chicken I'm Full of Corn. He uses slang in his songs.
25:50 Nathan grew up in a one-room sharp-shooter (shotgun) house. He talks about adding on the house with his brothers. Growing up in school, Nathan wanted to be a football player.
30:30 Nathan's family comes home. Nathan, Jr. plays accordion and rubboard. Junior goes and gets his accordion. Nathan's daughter was born on his birthday.
34:45 Nathan talks about growing up with his brothers and the kids in the neighborhood.
37:30 He started playing zydeco after he got better from his illness and was getting ready to get married. Before he had an accordion, he had a dream that he was playing accordion in front of a bunch of people. Clayton Salpy would come by the store and play the accordion. Nathan would listen to him and one day asked him if he could play his accordion. Instead, Clayton bought him an accordion. He still has that accordion. He says has about 7 accordions. He says he never really learned until he bought his own accordion and Romero's Music Store in Lafayette.
43:40

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco, Cajun, Creole, Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Sunday, August 15, 1993
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette, LA
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:34:01
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, October 5, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Monday, October 5, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Interview with Nathan Williams by Michael Tisserand Part 2

Accession No.: 
TI1-164

0:00 Tisserand is interviewing Nathan by phone and will be writing the notes to go with the new album. Nathan doesn't know the name of the album yet (Zydeco Crossroads) but mentions Zydeco Hog, the first track on the album, as a possibility. Nathan talks about some of the places and times he (as a kid) saw Clifton play. He says he listened to Clifton Chenier's tapes so much that he had them memorized. Nathan's song Ma Femme Nancy is about his wife. He explains some of the lyrics and old slang. He tells a story about the first time he ever heard Clifton's song "Black Snake Blues" with his grandmother. The first Zydeco song he ever heard on the radio was "Opelousas Sostan". When he was a kid, the older men would get together for a baza and play music.
11:00 He talks about how Clifton was a legend in his own time. Nathan says "You've got to wonder where you're going but you can't forget where you come from." He hopes his new album will revive the memories of people and remind them where the music comes from.
15:20 Nathan says he's been doing this music for ten years and has not been recognized by Big Easy Awards. He talks about his track record and touring and bringing Louisiana culture and music all over the country. He says even though he has been on commercials and national t.v., they don't recognize that. He says he doesn't get recognition locally but he plays here because it's where he comes from.
19:00 Nathan tell him about the songs on the album and how they came to be. They talk about the 'tomato gravy' lyric and its secret meaning.
23:38 Nathan talks about his experience playing with Michael Doucet on the album.
27:40 People ask him about the difference between Cajun and Zydeco music.
31:15 It's good to have a Cajun artist and a Zydeco artist playing together.
33:00 Nathan says people should read the history books before they talk about Cajuns. He says there are black Cajuns too.

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Michael Tisserand Collection
Subject: 
Zydeco, Cajun, Creole, Oral History
Creator: 
Michael Tisserand
Informants: 
Michael Tisserand
Recording date: 
Tuesday, June 13, 1995
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette, LA
Publisher: 
Michael Tisserand
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
38:58
Cataloged Date: 
Monday, October 5, 2020
Digitized Date: 
Monday, October 5, 2020
Original Format: 
cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore-- Drawer 72

Tribune des Francophones No. 1 face A-B

Accession No.: 
TR1.001.2

Recorded Winter of 1976;

Discours de Jacques Chirac devant l’Union des journalistes de langue française : Une offre de rapprochement et de paix

L’Académie française;

L’Académie française est née des réunions hebdomadaires d’un groupe d’intellectuels. Richelieu leur proposa de devenir un corps officiel et en 1635, Louis XIII signa la création de l’Académie française, qui comptait 40 membres. Leur rôle était d’examiner les ouvrages et de fixer les règles du langage.

La diffusion culturelle dans les pays francophones;

La langue française est considérée comme une langue d’intelligence et une langue tonique. La francophonie n’a pas de monopole, elle se nourrit notamment des apports des civilisations africaines (philosophie et art de vivre). Chaque peuple dispose d’une originalité particulière. Ainsi dans les Flandres cette particularité est façonnée par l’influence des libertés communales, des kermesses, de la musique et de la peinture. Quant à la Suisse romande, elle a été marquée par la Réforme et nous offre l’image de ce que serait devenue la France si le calvinisme avait fini par triompher : un pays marqué par le moralisme, le sérieux et l’introspection. Les auteurs francophones originaires de ces terres qui bordent l’hexagone (Suisse, Belgique, etc) ont contribué de manière importante à la richesse de la littérature francophone, et les événements historiques de leurs pays ont influencé leur façon de penser.
En Amérique du Nord, le rayonnement de la francophonie s’étend du Québec aux Antilles en passant par la Louisiane, Haïti, la Guadeloupe, la Martinique et la Guyane.
Au Canada la société française vivait autrefois en vase clos. Mais le Canada est aujourd’hui sur la voie de la reconquête, non économique mais culturelle. Ainsi les Acadiens ont reconquis en Louisiane la fierté légitime d’appartenir à la culture française.
Aux Antilles et en Amérique latine, l’élite est francophone et le peuple utilise un parler créole. Ces élites sont imprégnées de la philosophie du siècle des Lumières.
En Afrique du Nord et au Moyen-Orient, la culture française et la culture arabe se sont rencontrées en Méditerranée à travers le contact avec les croisés. Plus tard les conquêtes françaises ont amené une connaissance plus profonde de la culture française et de la culture musulmane. Mais trop souvent cette culture musulmane nous reste difficilement connue. Et ce sont davantage les divergences entre les cultures qui impressionnent les peuples, plutôt que les convergences.
Les civilisations d’Extrême-Orient sont très éloignées de nous, mais la culture française a reçu une empreinte spirituelle profonde au contact de la civilisation du Vietnam et des Khmers (Indochine française). Le français est devenue une langue véhiculaire et certains mots français sont passés dans la langue populaire du Vietnam.
La langue française n’est pas la langue du commerce et de l’industrie, mais demeure le véhicule de la pensée. Ainsi Paris est vue comme la capitale internationale de l’esprit.

L’Alliance française
L’Alliance française est une association culturelle privée, indépendante et apolitique dont le but est de protéger et promouvoir la langue française.

Language: 
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Tribune des Francophones
Subject: 
Academie francaise, francophonie, Alliance francaise
Recording date: 
Monday, January 5, 1976
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All rights reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
31:55
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, June 26, 2012
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Tribune des Francophones No. 1 face C-D

Accession No.: 
TR1.002.1

L’Alliance française (suite):
L’Ecole internationale de langue et civilisation françaises de Paris réunit 127 nationalités depuis 1945. Aujourd’hui l’Alliance française est présente dans 110 pays. C’est une association culturelle sans but lucratif qui vise à répandre la langue et la culture françaises. L’Alliance française offre également des bourses aux étudiants.
En 1943 a eu lieu le 60e anniversaire de l’Alliance française à Alger, anniversaire auquel a assisté le Général De Gaulle.
L’Alliance française est une école et un lieu de libre rencontre et d’échanges qui encourage l’ouverture à toutes les formes de culture. Elle tire son inspiration de ses conseillers et professeurs.
Le miracle de la francophonie en Louisiane:
La Louisiane est un fidèle foyer de la francophonie. Au sud-est, la Nouvelle- Acadie occupe un quart du territoire, là où se trouve le cours inférieur du Mississipi. Il y a encore beaucoup de descendants de ceux qui sont autrefois venus d’Acadie ou de France, environ 900 000 d’entre eux vivent toujours en Louisiane. Bien qu’éloignés de l’Acadie et de la France, ils se sont efforcés de sauvegarder leur héritage. Nous pouvons constater cela en observant le nom de certaines paroisses (Lafayette, Acadie, Beauregard, Lafourche, Orléans, Vermillion, Bienville, etc.) et villes louisianaises (Basile, Baton Rouge, Blanchard, Bienville, Broussard, etc), ainsi que les nombreux noms de famille à consonance française.

Quelques marqueurs historiques importants:
En 1604 l’Acadie devient la première colonie française. Les colons viennent de Bretagne, du Poitou et de Normandie.
En 1755 les Acadiens sont chassés par les Anglais et s’exilent en France et en Louisiane afin de rester catholique.
En 1673 Louis Jolliet et le Père Marquette découvrent le Mississipi. Quelques années plus tard en 1682 Cavelier de La Salle explore le fleuve du Mississipi et établit la fleur de lys en Louisiane pour le Roi de France Louis XIV. En 1699 la Louisiane est colonisée par les Français et Jean-Baptiste Bienville tient un rôle important dans cette colonisation. La Nouvelle-Orléans est fondée par Bienville en 1718.
En 1755 les Acadiens sont déportés et une partie d’entre eux arrive en Louisiane en 1765.
Louis XV cède la Louisiane à l’Espagne en 1763. Elle sera finalement rétrocédée à la France en 1800. Quelques années plus tard, en 1803, Napoléon accorde la Louisiane (qui s’étendait des Grands Lacs au Nord jusqu’au Mexique au Sud) aux nouveaux Etats-Unis pour 15 millions de dollars. Après l’acquisition d’autres territoires comme la Floride et l’Alaska, les Etats-Unis deviennent une puissance continentale puis mondiale.
En 1824 Lafayette visite les Etats-Unis.
Pendant la guerre de Sécession entre 1861 et 1865 les Louisianais de langue française servent dans les régiments sudistes.
En 1884 la ville de Vermillion devient celle de Lafayette et en 1825 le dernier quotidien de langue française L’abbaye cesse de paraître.
Pendant la première guerre mondiale, les Acadiens bilingues sont employés comme interprètes. La période de l’entre-deux guerres voit se développer la politique du Melting-pot, au détriment de la langue française qui n’est plus étudiée à l’école et dans les années 1920 et 1930 les enfants sont même sanctionnés quand ils parlent français a l’école. Dans les années 1960 le français n’est parlé que par les personnes d’un certain âge et la francophonie semble disparaître. C’était sans compter sur l’intervention de James Domengeaux, avocat acadien et ancien membre du Congrès à Washington. Il se consacre à la renaissance du français dans son état pour que la Louisiane devienne le premier état bilingue des Etats-Unis. Finalement en 1968 les lois 408 et 409 sont adoptées et entraînent la création du Conseil pour le Développement du français en Louisiane (CODOFIL).
L’action du CODOFIL consiste en l’organisation de conférences, d’interviews et en la publication d’articles. Le CODOFIL a mené une campagne de sensibilisation pour redonner confiance aux Acadiens afin qu’ils parlent à nouveau leur langue maternelle. Les slogans étaient les suivants : Soyez fiers de parler français ; Est ce que vos enfants apprennent le français a l’école ?
Pour enseigner le français au niveau élémentaire le CODOFIL a fait appel à des enseignants originaires de pays francophones comme la France, le Québec et la Belgique. Certains instituteurs pouvaient venir enseigner le français dans le cadre du service militaire et de la coopération militaire internationale. Les écoles privées bénéficient également des programmes bilingues. Le CODOFIL souhaiterait désormais créer des programmes en français à la radio.

Bilinguisme et éducation bilingue :
Le bilinguisme désigne un fait historique, politique, géographique ou l’état de quelqu’un pouvant s’exprimer aisément dans deux langues. L’éducation bilingue désigne l’acquisition d’un bilinguisme concerté, équilibré et harmonisé.
L’éducation bilingue ou plurilingue est nécessaire à tous : aux populations des pays en situation bilingue ou multilingue ; aux pays unilingues pour faciliter les relations entre les peuples et les pays ; aux pays en voie de développement qui ont besoin d’acquérir la maîtrise des langues répandues dans le monde de la technique.
La Fondation mondiale des villes jumelées vise à favoriser les efforts de l’éducation bilingue basée sur l’acquisition précoce d’une langue seconde pour favoriser la communication entre les peuples.

L’Association culturelle francophone par le tourisme international et social a été fondée en 1975. C’est une association à but non-lucratif qui a pour objectif de :
- Promouvoir et réaliser des rencontres et échanges nationaux et internationaux pour une meilleure compréhension des individus dans le respect de leurs convictions
- Favoriser le tourisme culturel et social
- Faciliter le resserrement des liens culturels et affectifs issus de la francophonie
L’association envisage d’organiser des échanges de jeunes, de familles et de retraités entre la France, le Québec et la Louisiane.

L’Agence pour la Coopération Culturelle et Technique a été fondée en 1970 à l’initiative du Président du Sénégal et du Président de la Tunisie avec pour objectif de diffuser les différentes cultures des pays membres et de favoriser la coopération scientifique et technique entre ces pays.

Language: 
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Tribune des Francophones
Subject: 
Alliance francaise, la Louisiane, bilinguisme
Recording date: 
Monday, January 5, 1976
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All rights reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
46:07
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, June 26, 2012
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Tribune des Francophones, No. 2 face 1A-2B

Accession No.: 
TR1.002.1

ƒditorial : 2e numŽro de la tribune des FrancophonesË lÕoccasion du bicentenaire des Etats-Unis, rendons gr‰ce au courage des AmŽricains et de leurs alliŽs qui ont vaincu, il y a 200 ans, douze millions de colonisateurs. Rendons hommage aux pionniers qui ont quittŽ leurs terres natales pour aller construire un nouveau monde et qui ont rŽussi ˆ rassembler de nombreux peuples en une communautŽ. Les Etats-Unis sont un exemple de solidaritŽ et de fraternitŽ. LÕAmŽrique a rŽussi ˆ b‰tir une fŽdŽration de peuples europŽens dans le Nouveau monde. Puisse lÕEurope suivre cet exemple et fonder une fŽdŽration europŽenne, les Etats-Unis dÕEurope. La France et lÕindŽpendance amŽricaine, livre du bicentenaire de lÕindŽpendance, ouvrage Žcrit par le Duc de Castries de lÕAcadŽmie franaise. Synonymes de puissance matŽrielle, de bond vers lÕavenir et de civilisation spontanŽe, les Etats-Unis sont devenus un vaste et puissant Žtat en moins de deux sicles. Et lÕamitiŽ entre la France et les Etats-Unis sÕest maintenue intacte depuis deux sicles.La dŽcolonisation jadis et aujourdÕhui : ˆ quel moment un territoire se considre t-il capable de fonder une nation ?La seconde moitie du XXe sicle a vu presque toutes les colonies se constituer en Žtats souverains. Mais il faut tre conscient de la diffŽrence absolue entre les dŽcolonisations contemporaines et la dŽcolonisation qui a fait des deux AmŽriques des Žtats indŽpendants. Au XXe sicle, les populations indignes ont chassŽ les coloniaux pour rŽcupŽrer les territoires qui leur avaient ŽtŽ confisquŽs lors des conqutes des colonisateurs. En AmŽrique, les populations indignes dŽcimŽes ou refoulŽes dans des rŽserves nÕont pas profitŽ de la dŽcolonisation. Ce sont les colons eux-mmes qui se sont sŽparŽs de leur mre patrie, et ont constituŽ des nouveaux Žtats sous leur contr™le. Cette situation posa le problme de la reconnaissance diplomatique dÕun Žtat qui sÕŽtait constituŽ spontanŽment par un acte de rŽvolte envers le pouvoir dont il dŽpendait lŽgitimement. Mais le traitŽ dÕalliance signŽ entre la France et les Etats-Unis en 1778, constituŽ dÕun accord commercial et dÕune assistance militaire entre la France et les Etats-Unis, a fait jurisprudence.Dans les dŽbuts, le peuple amŽricain nÕavait pas rŽelle conscience de lÕaide matŽrielle apportŽe la France, aide financire et assistance dans lÕarmement. Le Congrs sollicita lÕaide franaise, car la France Žtait lÕun des pays les plus important dÕEurope et Žtait hostile ˆ lÕAngleterre.En 1787 la Constitution des Etats-Unis dÕAmŽrique fut signŽe. Mais un dŽsaccord perdura concernant le choix de la capitale : Boston, Philadelphie ? Au lieu de choisir une de ces villes, George Washington dŽcida que la capitale des Etats-Unis serait sa crŽation personnelle. Il choisit un marŽcage au bord du Potomac, un compromis entre le Nord et le Sud. Il dŽsigna Charles LÕEnfant comme architecte de la future capitale. LÕEnfant, qui arriva en AmŽrique ˆ peu prs en mme temps que Lafayette, Žtait influencŽ par lÕarchitecture franaise. Il dessina les plans de la ville et fixa les cožts des travaux du Capitole ˆ 95 000 dollars, mais le Congrs jugea son projet insensŽ et lui refusa les crŽdits pour construire le Capitole. Aprs 10 ans de lutte, il fut Žconduit et mourut dans la misre. Les plans de LÕEnfant furent plus tard utilisŽs pour construire la capitale des Etats-Unis. Diverses festivitŽs sont prŽvues aux Etats-Unis et en France pour cŽlŽbrer le bicentenaire et lÕamitiŽ entre ces deux pays. Le PrŽsident franais ValŽry Giscard dÕEstaing est invitŽ aux Etats-unis. Il se rendra tout dÕabord a Washington, puis sÕarrtera ˆ Houston et enfin a Lafayette.LÕAcadŽmie franaise Le r™le de lÕAcadŽmie franaise depuis 1635 consiste ˆ examiner les ouvrages et fixer les rgles du langage. Le but est de conserver et perfectionner la langue franaise pour quÕelle puisse succŽder au grec et au latin. Ainsi les acadŽmiciens condamnent certains abus, approuvent certains termes nouveaux, et prŽcisent le sens des mots qui prtent a ambigu•tŽ.Conrart fut le premier secrŽtaire de lÕAcadŽmie franaise. En 1647 Corneille est Žlu acadŽmicien. LÕun des principes de lÕAcadŽmie franaise est lÕŽgalitŽ. Ainsi aucune distinction nÕest faite, et il nÕy a pas de dŽsavantage entre les acadŽmiciens. La premire Ždition du dictionnaire avec lÕordre alphabŽtique est prŽsentŽe au roi en 1692. Et la deuxime Ždition para”t en 1718. Le dictionnaire fixe lÕorthographe et le sens des mots par des dŽfinitions accompagnŽes dÕexemples. Ë chaque Ždition, le nombre de mots augmenta et le changement dÕorthographe alla dans le sens de la simplification, par exemple beaucoup de mots furent dŽbarrassŽs de lettres inutiles. Durant la Terreur, lÕAcadŽmie franaise ainsi que dÕautres AcadŽmies furent supprimŽes par un dŽcret de 1793. Certains membres de lÕAcadŽmie furent guillotinŽs comme Baillay, Malesherbes ou Nicola•. Condorcet sÕempoisonna et dÕautres acadŽmiciens immigrrent ou se cachrent pendant la Terreur. Le directeur rŽussit tout de mme ˆ sauver et ˆ cacher les archives, y compris les feuilles du dictionnaire dont la rŽvision Žtait terminŽe. En 1795, lÕAcadŽmie franaise fut ˆ nouveau autorisŽe et en 1798 la 5e Ždition du dictionnaire fut publiŽe. En 1816, Louis XVIII dŽcida que lÕInstitut de France serait composŽ de 4 acadŽmies : lÕAcadŽmie franaise, lÕAcadŽmie des inscriptions et belles lettres, lÕAcadŽmie des sciences et lÕAcadŽmie des beaux arts. LÕorganisation actuelle est celle de 1816 avec en plus lÕAcadŽmie des sciences morales et politiques qui fut crŽŽe en 1832. La 6e Ždition du dictionnaire fut publiŽe en 1835 et la 7e Ždition en 1878. De nos jours, lÕAcadŽmie franaise sige chaque semaine le jeudi aprs-midi. Et chaque annŽe au mois de dŽcembre se tient une sŽance publique. CÕest ˆ ce moment quÕa lieu la rŽception solennelle des nouveaux Žlus.

Language: 
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Tribune des Francophones
Subject: 
Bicentenaire de lÕindŽpendance amŽricaine, AcadŽmie franaise
Recording date: 
Monday, January 5, 1976
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All rights reserved
Meta Information
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, June 26, 2012
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Tribune des Francophones, No. 2 face C-D

Accession No.: 
TR1.002.2

LÕAcadŽmie franaise (suite)Dans les nouvelles Žditions du dictionnaire sont entrŽs des nŽologismes et certains mots dÕorigine anglaise comme Ç surprise party È. Au moment de sa crŽation, les femmes nÕŽtaient pas admises a lÕAcadŽmie franaise. Beaucoup dÕhommes dÕEglise Žtaient Žlus et lÕAcadŽmie ne pouvait passer outre un veto du pouvoir. Depuis 1635 jusqu'ˆ nos jours, le nombre dÕacadŽmiciens, ou Ç immortels È, sÕŽlve ˆ 650. Le Collge de France fut fondŽ un sicle avant lÕAcadŽmie franaise. Les 5 acadŽmies de lÕInstitut de France sont :- LÕAcadŽmie franaise, fondŽe par Richelieu en 1635. Son r™le est dÕexaminer les ouvrages et de fixer les rgles de la langue franaise.- LÕAcadŽmie des Beaux Arts. En 1648 le roi approuva la crŽation de lÕAcadŽmie de Peinture et de Sculpture. Les femmes nÕŽtaient pas exclues de cette AcadŽmie. - LÕAcadŽmie des inscriptions et belles lettres fondŽe en 1663 par Colbert, elle Žtait surnommŽe la petite acadŽmie. Elle Žtait en charge des descriptions historiques des ŽvŽnements que commŽmoraient les mŽdailles, des descriptions des antiquitŽs et monuments franais et de la connaissance de lÕantiquitŽ grecque et latine. - LÕAcadŽmie des sciences, dont lÕinstallation officielle eu lieu en 1666. Son r™le est de cultiver et perfectionner les sciences. Ses membres disposent de crŽdits pour Žquiper leurs laboratoires et pour construire des machines. Chaque semaine, lÕAcadŽmie publie les comptes-rendus de ses sŽances.- LÕAcadŽmie des sciences morales et politiques fondŽe en 1795. Chaque semaine, ses membres discutent une question ˆ lÕordre du jour concernant les sciences humaines. Le Conseil International de la Langue franaise a ŽtŽ fondŽ en 1967 et son but est de sauvegarder lÕunitŽ de la langue franaise dans le monde.Le Conseil de la vie franaise en AmŽrique a ŽtŽ crŽŽ au QuŽbec en 1937. Ses membres reprŽsentent les groupements franais du Canada, des Etats-Unis et des Antilles et ils cherchent ˆ soutenir les intŽrts des populations franaises en AmŽrique du Nord. La francophonie La langue franaise vaut dՐtre dŽfendue pour ses caractŽristiques (clartŽ prŽcision et logique) et pour son universalitŽ. En effet plus de 150 millions de personnes sur 5 continents parlent franais. Depuis le XVIIe sicle, le franais est une langue de culture et la langue utilisŽe par les Žlites de nombreux pays non francophones. Mais avec les changements de rŽgimes et de sociŽtŽ, nous assistons ˆ la disparition des Žlites francophones. Le franais recule devant la trs forte expansion de lÕanglais, considŽrŽ comme la langue de la communication internationale. Le franais est envahi de termes anglo-amŽricains. Des institutions francophones ont donc ŽtŽ crŽŽes pour protŽger et sauvegarder la langue franaise. Il est nŽcessaire dÕaccro”tre la solidaritŽ entre les pays francophones mais aussi de favoriser lÕŽgalitŽ et la complŽmentaritŽ dans les rapports avec les autres langues et les autres cultures. La francophonie existe tout comme lÕanglophonie et, selon un principe de rŽciprocitŽ, il faut que les Franais apprennent des langues Žtrangres.Il y a une volontŽ dÕaccro”tre la prŽsence et lÕinfluence culturelle franaises aux Etats-Unis. La francophonie se dŽveloppe comme un moyen pour Žviter dՐtre absorbŽ par lÕun des deux empires qui se partagent le monde ˆ lÕheure actuelle. En effet, la France et les pays francophones aspirent ˆ une organisation du monde diffŽrente de celle qui sÕest Žtablie depuis 1945 et esprent pouvoir apporter une contribution franaise ˆ un nouvel ordre mondial. Ceci est favorisŽ par lÕappui de toutes les personnes ayant appris le franais ˆ lÕŽcole ou au sein de leur famille dans dÕautres pays, ce sont les francophones (QuŽbŽcois, Romans, AfricainsÉ), nos cousins par le langage.La francophonie, dimension de la politique franaise, ne vit que par le dialogue entre les diffŽrentes cultures francophones qui forment une communautŽ basŽe sur lÕŽgalitŽ, communautŽ qui fait vivre les valeurs morales et humaines hŽritŽes de 1789. Le principe dÕEurafrique dŽsigne la coopŽration privilŽgiŽe entre les pays africains et lÕEurope. LÕEurope entretient Žgalement des liens particuliers avec les pays dÕIndochine et avec les communautŽs francophones dÕAmŽrique.Comment le Canada favorise t-il la francophonie ?Le QuŽbec a mis en Ïuvre un programme dÕassistance technique en Afrique francophone. Le Canada a aussi organisŽ le rassemblement de la jeunesse francophone, connu sous le nom de Francofte. Le pays prŽvoit aussi de mettre en place un projet de dŽveloppement en Ha•ti dans le domaine de la santŽ et du logement. Investir sur la langue franaise Le Conseil international a permis la publication dÕune collection de vocabulaire technique pour rŽpondre aux besoins des chercheurs et ingŽnieurs. Cette collection traite des sujets suivants : pŽtrole, transport, radio et tŽlŽvision, finance, travaux publics et urbanisme, Žnergies nuclŽaires, techniques spatiales, informatique. Le Conseil a Žgalement participŽ a la publication de manuels techniques sur la mŽcanique et lÕagronomie tropicale, ˆ destination des pays du Tiers-Monde. Le combat francophone au CanadaLe Canada est officiellement bilingue et compte dÕimportants foyers de francophones dans lÕOuest du pays. La culture anglo-amŽricaine est dominante et les groupes francophones de lÕOuest sont minoritaires. Ë la fin du XIXe , lÕOuest du Canada sÕouvre ˆ la colonisation et des populations mŽtisses de langue franaise sÕy installent. En 1890 la population anglaise devient majoritaire et le Manitoba est dŽclarŽ anglais. Ainsi les francophones perdent leurs droits linguistiques et religieux. La langue maternelle devient langue seconde et elle sÕappauvrit au contact de lÕanglais. Mais des organismes de dŽfense de la langue franaise sÕorganisent (paroisses, Žcoles) et les Žglises ou le franais est la langue du culte servent de centres culturels franais (scout, choraleÉ). Les foyers francophones Žvoluent Žgalement. Si les familles Žtaient autrefois catholiques et parlaient le franais, cette langue est devenue langue seconde, et les jeunes parents peinent ˆ transmettre ˆ leurs enfants une langue quÕils connaissent mal.Des collges et des couvents offrant un enseignement universitaire en franais sont Žtablis par les congrŽgations religieuses venues du QuŽbec ou de France. Et gr‰ce ˆ la politique du bilinguisme et du biculturalisme, ces collges franais peuvent tre intŽgrŽs au systme universitaire des autres provinces. AujourdÕhui beaucoup dÕŽcoles proposent un enseignement bilingue. Les Associations provinciales tiennent Žgalement un r™le important dans la promotion de la langue et de la culture franaises. Elles ont permis la crŽation de coopŽratives, lÕorganisation de voyages-Žchanges et de rallyes. Des troupes de thŽ‰tre et des chorales ont aussi ŽtŽ crŽŽes. En outre la tŽlŽvision franaise diffuse des programmes pour enfants en franais.Le gouvernement a aussi lancŽ la crŽation de grandes unitŽs scolaires avec des classes pour francophones et des classes pour anglophones. Le changement de la loi scolaire a rendu possible lÕenseignement en franais de matires scolaires autre que le franais. Comment est nŽe la notion de francophonieLa francophonie est une notion nouvelle qui est apparue pendant la pŽriode de la dŽcolonisation aprs la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Avec lÕencha”nement des dŽclarations dÕindŽpendances, il y a une prise de conscience de lÕexistence ˆ travers le monde de nombreuses nations qui entendent se dŽvelopper et se cultiver par la langue franaise. Le terme Ç francophone È est finalement lancŽ dans lÕusage courant par le Magazine Esprit en 1962. Plus tard la distinction des notions de francophonie et de francitŽ est Žtablie. La francitŽ dŽsigne lÕensemble des valeurs de civilisation du monde francophone alors que la francophonie dŽsigne lÕensemble des pays o lÕon parle franais. DiversitŽ des anglicismes : Anglicisme orthographique, typographique, morphologique, sŽmantique, syntaxique. Une idŽe ancienne encore valable de nos joursRabelais suppose que nous avons assez dÕintelligence pour conserver notre sang-froid. Mais aujourdÕhui nous avons tendance ˆ nous libŽrer outre mesure. La libertŽ totale de lÕesprit mne ˆ la violence. La littŽrature du XVIe sicle, et notamment les idŽes de Rabelais, peuvent nous aider ˆ trouver lÕharmonie entre la libertŽ de lÕesprit et la ma”trise de soi.

Language: 
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Tribune des Francophones
Subject: 
Institut de France, francophonie, Canada
Recording date: 
Monday, January 5, 1976
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All rights reserved
Meta Information
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, June 26, 2012
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Tribunes des Francophones cassette

Accession No.: 
TR1.002.2

Le bilinguisme en l’an 2000
En l’an 2000, les nouvelles technologies rapprocheront les gens et les moyens de communication instantanée seront à la portée de tous. Il y aura une révolution culturelle et une révolution dans les transports.
L’intérêt du bilinguisme pour la nation est qu’il permet d’enrichir notre esprit. La langue et la culture s’entremêlent. Ainsi en apprenant une langue étrangère nous pouvons comprendre plus facilement les mœurs, les coutumes, la culture et la psychologie du peuple étranger. Faciliter l’échange d’opinions et d’influence entre pays favorise l’enrichissement de la culture d’un pays et le développement de la tolérance sur le plan international.
Les langues classiques sont encore étudiées dans le monde entier (latin, grec, etc). Étudier une autre langue nous pousse à confronter diverses façons de penser et ainsi accroît la vivacité de l’esprit.
La traduction est utile, mais elle a ses limites. Les traductions ne peuvent transmettre que le contenu, non le contenant. Pourtant le fond et la forme sont tous deux essentiels à la compréhension et à l’appréciation d’un texte. La traduction transmet l’idée, mais pas l’expression. Par exemple en poésie, il est impossible de traduire le son ou la mélodie d’un texte (assonance, etc).

La France est continentale, méditerranéenne, occidentale et nordique. De la Méditerranée, elle tire une influence des civilisations antiques et classiques, ainsi que le contact avec l’Afrique, l’Asie et l’Orient. Du Nord sont arrivés les armées conquérantes, les explorateurs et les colons, qui s’établirent dans le Nouveau monde depuis le Canada jusqu'aux Antilles.
Ouverte aux échanges, la France est considérée comme la plaque tournante des civilisations. Sa situation géopolitique la pousse à jouer les médiatrices. Paris est ainsi à égale distance du centre des Etats-Unis et du centre de l’URSS.

Etant séparés de l’Europe et de l’Asie par deux océans, les Américains ne pourraient parler que l’anglais. Néanmoins l’Amérique ne peut se passer de bilinguisme pour des raisons économique, diplomatique et culturelle. La politique du Melting-pot a fonctionné pour intégrer les immigrants. Mails il est maintenant indispensable que les Américains fassent renaître la langue de leurs ancêtres. Des efforts ont été faits en Louisiane par le CODOFIL et en Nouvelle-Angleterre, et les programmes ont été bien accueillis par les anglophones de ces régions.
Le français est une langue universelle parlée dans 40 pays. L’Esperanto, inventé en 1887, pourrait être la solution pour la communication internationale. Mais malgré les efforts pour promouvoir cette langue artificielle, son emploi reste très limité.
Après la Seconde Guerre Mondiale il y a eu une forte volonté de reconstruire un monde meilleur, un monde où tous les hommes pourraient se comprendre et ou régneraient l’entende internationale et la fraternité humaine. Ainsi Jean-Marie Bressand fonda en 1951 le Monde Bilingue, et en 1957 la Fédération des villes jumelées. Le jumelage de villes françaises et anglaises fut un énorme succès. L’anglais et le français sont les langues les plus utilisées dans les organisations internationales comme l’ONU, l’Unesco, etc. Le bilinguisme anglais-francais semble donc indispensable. La maîtrise d’une langue étrangère permet de mieux comprendre et communiquer avec l’autre. Aussi les interventions américaines dans les conflits a l’étranger en Corée et au Vietnam ont été la conséquence, selon certains, du manque de perspicacité concernant la mentalité et la psychologie des Orientaux.

Investir sur la langue française
L’Association Internationale de la Langue Française fondée en 1967 a établi une politique générale de la langue française dans le monde pour redonner au français son statut de langue de communication alors que l’opinion publique considérait la langue française uniquement comme un objet d’art et de littérature. Les objectifs de l’association sont :
- Favoriser l’accès à un patrimoine littéraire et culturel
- Assurer la communication entre les membres d’une même communauté
- Exprimer tous les aspects du monde moderne, notamment les objets et notions nouvelles nés de la civilisation scientifique et technique de la fin du XXe siècle

Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Tribune des Francophones
Recording date: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
Coverage Spatial: 
Lafayette, LA
Publisher: 
Center for Louisiana Studies
Rights Usage: 
All rights reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
38:07
Cataloged Date: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore

Dick Richard at Mulate’s.

Accession No.: 
TR2-001

Song 1 – Je m’ennui plus de toi (0:01)
Song 2 – Old Fashioned Two Step (4:14)
Song 3 – Trop jeune pour marier (7:17)
Song 4 – She Didn’t Know I Was Married (10:08)
Song 5 – Diga Ding Ding Dong (13:30)
Song 6 - Zydecos sont pas sale (16:20)
Song 7 – La valse de Cajun/Cajun Waltz (20:08)
Song 8 – Jambalaya (23:38)
Song 9 – Tous les soirs (27:09)
Song 10 – Highpoint Two Step (31:20)
Song 11 – La valse du malchanceux (34:17)
Song 12 – ‘Tits yeux noirs (38:26)
Song 13 – Choupique Two Step (41:36)
Song 14 – J’ai fait mon idée (44:22)
Song 15 – La pointe aux pins (47:06)
Song 16 – Oh ye yaille (50:43)
Song 17 – Pine Grove Blues (55:00)
Song 18 – Belizaire Waltz (1:02:30)
Song 19 – Bosco Stomp (1:06:33)
Song 20 – Reno Waltz (1:10:13)
Song 21 – The Back Door (1:13:40)
Song 22 – I Can’t Forget You/ J’peux pas t’oublier (1:17:34)
Song 23 – La dernière fois (1:24:58)
Song 24 – Catch My Hat (1:28:05)
Song 25 – La valse de ‘tit Maurice (1:32:00)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Live,
Creator: 
Lisa Trahan
Recording date: 
Friday, October 12, 1990
Coverage Spatial: 
Breaux Bridge
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Lisa Trahan
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:34:28
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Cyprien Landreneau and Adam Landreneau. From "Louisiana Cajun and Creole Music : The Newport Field Recordings"

Accession No.: 
TR2-003

Song 1 – La robe à Rosalie (0:13)
Song 2 – La prairie ronde (3:25)
Song 3 – La taille d’eronces (6:23)
Song 4 – Les pinieres (8:12)
Song 5 – Treville t’es pas pecheur (11:15)
Song 6 – La danse de limonade (13:00)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Album
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Coverage Spatial: 
Evangeline Parish
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
15:01
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

The Carrière Brothers, from « The Carrière Brothers: Musique Creole » and « La La Louisiana Black French Music » /Mitch Reed Fiddle Lesson.

Accession No.: 
TR2-004

Song 1 – Zydeco de Carrière (0:18)
Song 2 – Madame Faielle (2:12)
Song 3 – Daddy Carrière Waltz (4:01)
Song 4 – Zydeco sont pas sale (6:16)
Song 5 – Les barres de la prison (8:36)
Song 6 – Jolie Catin (11:18)
Song 7 – Robe a parasol (13:10)
Song 8 – Home Sweet Home (16:20)
Song 9 – Hey Mom! (18:05)
*Switches to Mitch Reed Fiddle Lesson*
(20:30 – 31:09)
*Switches to « La La Louisiana Black French Music » *
Song 1 – Zydeco a Carriere (31:30)
Song 2 – Robe a parasol (32:51)
Song 3 – Blue Runner (35:31)
Song 4 – Blues of the Lonesome Road (37:25)
Song 5 – Johnny Can’t Dance (40:40)
Song 6 – Valse a Cherokee/Cherokee Waltz (42:50)
Song 7 – Bosco Stomp (45:05)
Song 8 – Blues a bebe (47:25)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Creole, Cajun, Hometape, Fiddle
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Coverage Spatial: 
Evangeline Parish
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
50:46
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Home Recording of Mitch Reed and Calvin Carrière

Accession No.: 
TR2-005

Song 1 – Tous les deux pour la même (0:00)
Song 2 – Grand Texas (1:37)
Song 3 – Colinda (3:48)
Song 4 – Petite ou la grosse (7:20)
Song 5 – J’ai passé devant ta porte (9:50)
Song 6 – Cherokee Waltz (13:40)
Song 7 – Unknown tune (Quand j’etais pauvre) (18:50) *
Song 8 – Blue Runner (21:40)
Song 9 – Blues a bebe (23:33)
Song 10 – Unknown tune (« I forgot [the name of the song] ») (black snake blues?) (25:48) *
Song 11 – Unknown tune (27:30)
Song 12 – Hippy Taio (28:44)
Song 13 – Unknown tune (34:15)
Song 14 – Unknown tune (36:45)
Song 15 – Eunice Two Step (38:27)
Song 16 – Grand Mamou (40:30)
Song 17 – Donnez-moi mon chapeau (43:10)
Song 18 – Mon vieux wagon (45:25)
Song 19 – Les flames d’enfer (47:58)
Song 20 – Jongle à moi (50:30)
Song 21 – Unknown tune (58:33)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Fiddle, French, Creole, Home Recording, Folk Music
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Saturday, December 12, 1992
Coverage Spatial: 
Evangeline Parish
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:01:16
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

The Revon Reed Tapes: Preston Manuel, Chuck Guillory, Shirley Bergeron, Floyd Fuselier, Cheese Read, and Aubrey Deville.

Accession No.: 
TR2-006

Song 1 – Grand Texas (0:00)
Song 2 – Tolam Waltz (1:54)
Song 3 – Grand Mamou (4:29)
Song 4 – Jolie Blonde (7:03)
Song 5 – Les jeunes gens de la campagne (9:39)
Song 6 – La danse de limonade (12:10)
Song 7 – Valse de mon grand galaxy (14:04)
Song 8 – Grand Mamou (15:16)
Song 9 – Pauvre Hobo (18:34)
Song 10 – San Antonio Rose (21:38)
Song 11 – Unknown waltz (like chere meon) (23:23) *
Song 12 – La jig de mardi gras (26:25)
Song 13 – La valse de Cherokee/Cherokee Waltz (27:11)
Song 14 – J’ai passé devant ta porte (29:13)
Song 15 – Grand Texas (31:30)
Song 16 – La valse de grand Reno/Reno Waltz (33:50)
Song 17 – Sundown Special (37:22)
Song 18 – Chere Alice (39:43)
Song 19 – Faded love (43:33)
Song 20 –T’es petite mais t’es mignonne (45:32)
Song 21 – Chere Meon (how it is spelt on the record) (chere mignonne) (47:39) *
Song 22 – Unknown breakdown (sugarfoot rag?) (49:11) *
Song 23 – Dans la louisiane (50:51)
Song 24 – La jog a plombeau (52:40)
Song 25 – Jolie Blonde (55:24)
Song 26 – Mon bon vieux mari (57:31)
Song 27 – Grand Mamou (1:00:50)
Song 28 – No name stomp (1:03:17)
Song 29 – La valse de grand port auteur (1:04:40)
Song 30 – Flow Bouncers Stomp (1:06:55)
Song 31 – Emotion waltz (1:09:00)
Song 32 – Mardi Gras (1:11:30)
Song 33 – La marche de marier (1:13:34)
Song 34 –Mazurka (1:16:32)
Song 35 – Unknown waltz (1:18:30)*
Song 36 – J’ai passe devant ta porte (1:19:56)
Song 37 – Grand Texas (1:23:00)
Song 38 – Unknown tune (des pins/along the pines) (1:26:08)*
Song 39 – Unknown, “mes chers ‘tits yeux bleus” (same tune as wild side of life) (1:28:50)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Live, Radio, Talking
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Saturday, February 27, 1965
Coverage Spatial: 
Fred's Lounge, Mamou
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:31:38
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Lomax Recordings 1934/Cajun and Creole Mus, Vol 1 & 2

Accession No.: 
TR2-007

Song 1 – The Kaplan Mazurka (0:08)
Song 2 – Wayne Perry - Creole Blues (0:56)
Song 3 – Wayne Perry - Cajun Waltz (2:22)
Song 4 – Wayne Perry - Waltz (3:50)
Song 5 – Wayne Perry - Easy Rider Blues (Cajun Two Step) (5:28)
Song 6 – The Segura Brothers - Viens donc t’assir sur la croix de ma tombe (6:45)
Song 7 –Joe Segura – Joe Feraille (9:22)
Song 8 – Joe Segura – Un te pas gain de l’air (11:50)
Song 9 – Oakdale Carriere – Catin, prie donc pour ton negre (15:22)
Song 10 – Paul Junius Malveaux and Ernest Lafitte - Bye Bye, bonsoir, mes parents (17:05)
Song 11 – Paul Junius Malveaux and Ernest Lafitte - Tous les samedis (18:30)
*Switches to cajun and Creole Music, Vol 1*
Song 12 – Six ans sur mer (21:25)
Song 13 – Les clefs de la prison (24:16)
Song 14 – J’ai vu lucille (26:03)
Song 15 – La belle et le capitaine (26:30)
Song 16 – Une fille de quatorze ans (31:06)
Song 17 – Mademoiselle Émélie (35:30)
Song 18 – Tout un beau soir en me promenant (38:25)
*Switches to Cajun and Creole Music, Vol 2*
Song 19 – Belle (41:05)
Song 20 – Je m’endors (43:15)
Song 21 – Je me suis Marie (44:38)
Song 22 – Trinquons (45:38)
Song 23 – La chanson de Savoy (46:24)
Song 24 – La chanson de Theogene Dubois (48:00)
Song 25 – J’ai marie un ouvrier (49:00)
Song 26 – Madama Gallien (52:18)
Song 27 – Je m’ai fait une maitresse (54:43)
Song 28 – Les amours sonts courts (57:45)
Song 29 – Mes amis, je suis gris (59:00)
Song 30 – Le pays des estrangers (1:00:40)
Song 31 - Dego/Zydeco (1:01:55)
Song 32 – J’ai fait tout le tour du pays (1:04:05)
Song 33 – S’en aller chez moreau (1:05:56)
Song 34 – Je veux me marier (1:07:45)
Song 35 – Blues de la prison (1:09:28)
Song 36 – La-bas chez moreau (1:14:07)
Song 37 – Feel Like Dying in His Army (1:18:16)
Song 38 – Rockaway (1:21:20)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Creole, Ballads, Lomax
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:23:13
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Harry Trahan (accordion and vocals), Mitch Reed (fiddle), Corey McCauley and Lisa Trahan on guitar.

Accession No.: 
TR2-008

Song 1 – One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer (0:08)
Song 2 - T’en a eu, t’en auras plus (2:59)
Song 3 – Eunice Two Step (6:15)
Song 4 – Tous les soirs (8:14) *
Song 5 – Bayou Pon Pon (10:14)
Song 6 – Chere bebe creole (12:25) *
Song 7 – ‘Tit Maurice (15:56) *
Song 8 – Diggy Diggy Lo (18:26)
Song 9 – Unknown waltz (20:42) *
Song 10 – J’étais au bal (22:45)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Hometape, Talking
Creator: 
Lisa Trahan
Informants: 
Lisa Trahan
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Lisa Trahan
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
25:56
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Mitch Reed (fiddle and vocals) , with Another Unknown Fiddle Player and Vocalist.

Accession No.: 
TR2-011

Song 1 – Unknown fiddle tune (lake arthur stomp?) (0:04) *
Song 2 – Bonsoir Moreau (2:20)
Song 3 – Unknown fiddle tune (5:58) *
Song 4 – Pointe aux pins (7:40)
Song 5 – Reel à bouche (10:18)
Song 6 – Unknown fiddle tune (11:26) *
Song 7 – Lougaroo mange pas mes enfants (14:30)
Song 8 – Unknown fiddle tune (16:22) *
Song 9 – Saute Crapeau (19:15)
Song 10 – La coulée rodaire (22:10)
Song 11 – Turkey In The Straw (25:15)
Song 12 – Unknown fiddle tune (27:52) *
Song 13 – Perrodin Two Step (29:39)
Song 14 – Unknown song (32:18) *
Song 15 – Guilbeaux’s Pelican (34:40)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Fiddle
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
38:56
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

La Veillée des Veillées, La Group de Portneuf. Ruine-Babines, Rêve du Diable, Louis Boudreault. French Canadian Fest.

Accession No.: 
TR2-012

Song 1 –Reel des ouvriers (0:01)
Song 2 – Reel à Hélène (1:47)
Song 3 – La tugue bleue (3:15)
Song 4 – Reel d’isidore soucy et Reel des noces d’or (5:40)
Song 5 – Blues du canard (7:20)
Song 7 – Turlute à Antonio (11:10)
Song 8 – La Belle Catherine (16:20)
Song 9 – Reel du pêcheur (20:40)
Song 10 – Unknown Reel (24:10)
Song 11 – Reel du Lièvre (27:50)
Song 12 – Derriere chez nous y’a un champs de pois (31:20)
Song 13 – En filant ma quenouille (35:05)
Song 14 – L’homme à deux femmes (37:15)
Song 15 – À la claire fontaine (40:05) *
Song 16 – Bourrée (43:30)
Song 17 – Sony’s Mazurka (46:20)
Song 18 – Laridé Lokmariakêr (49:38)
Song 19 – The Exile’s Jig and the Flowing Tide (51:45)
Song 20 – Paddy Ryans’s Dream (57:13)
Song 21 – Set amércain (1:00:05)

Language: 
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Live, Canadian French
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Canada
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:02:10
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

The Revon Reed Tapes: Roy Fuselier, Arteleus Mistric, Canray Fontenot, Bois Sec Ardoin/Amédé Ardoin

Accession No.: 
TR2-013

Song 1 – J’etais au bal (0:05)
Song 2 – J’etais au bal (1:01)
Song 3 – Jeunes gens de la campagne (1:29)
Song 4 – Bonsoir moreau (3:59)
Song 5 – Chere Tout Tout (5:01)
Song 6 – La danse de la misere (7:29)
Song 7 – La robe barrée (8:07)
Song 8 – Proche Parré (10:17)
Song 9 – Bosco Stomp (13:02)
Song 10 – Tolam Waltz (14:55)
Song 11 – Port Arthur Blues (17:01)
Song 12 – Unknown tune (18:29)
Song 13 – ‘Tit monde (19:46)
Song 14 – Talking/Proche Parré (22:50)
Song 15 – Les barres de la prison (26:30)
Song 16 – Canray’s One Step (27:00)
Song 17 – La danse de la misere (28:01)
Song 18 – Laccasine Breakdown (29:04)
Song 19 – J’etais au bal (31:24)
Song 20 – Bonsoir moreau (34:30)
Song 21 – ‘Tit monde (38:20)
Song 22 – Quo faire (40:41)
Song 23 – La valse des amities (la valse d’amour?) (44:44)
Song 24 – Les blues de voyage (vieille blues?) (47:41)
Song 25 – Grand Mamou (50:40)
Song 26 – Port Arthur Blues (si tu voudrais ma main?) (53:35)
Song 27 – La belle de la pointe claire/Belle of Point Claire (56:50)
Song 28 – Tu m’a partient (58:40)
Song 29 – La danse de mulate (1:01:33)
Song 30 – Mamou Two Step (1:03:36)
Song 31 – ‘Tit Maurice (1:04:20) *
Song 32 – Ils ont volé mon traineau (1:05:07)
Song 33 – La valse qui m’fait du mal (1:05:56)
Song 34 – Bayou Pon Pon (1:08:43)
Song 35 – Mamou Two Step/Orphan’s Waltz (1:09:35) *
Song 36 – Chere Cherie (1:12:05)
Song 37 – Part of les flames d’enfer (1:14:50) *
Song 38 – La valse du musicien (1:15:20)
Song 39 – Bosco Stomp (1:17:18)
Song 40 – Pine Grove Blues (1:20:25)
Song 41 – Saute Crapeau (1:24:09)
Song 42 – La jig de mardi gras/Mardi Gras Jig (1:25:47)
Song 43 – La valse de pardon/Pardon Waltz (1:27:22)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Creole, Live, Radio, Talking
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Fred's Lounge, Mamou
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:31:10
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Varise Connor/Lionel Leleux

Accession No.: 
TR2-015

Song 1 – Unknown tune (0:01)
Song 2 – Unknown tune (0:34)
Song 3 – Unknown tune (2:05)
Song 4 – Unknown tune (3:07)
Song 5 – Unknown tune (4:20)
Song 6 – Unknown tune (6:16)
Song 7 – Unknown tune (8:50)
Song 8 – Unknown tune (10:32)
Song 9 – Unknown tune (11:20)
Song 10 – Unknown tune (13:40)
Song 11 – Unknown tune (14:55)
Song 12 – Unknown tune (16 :12)
Song 13 – Unknown tune (18:03)
Song 14 – Unknown tune (19:40)
Song 15 – Unknown tune (22:00)
Song 16 – J’ai passé devant ta porte (22:55)
Song 17 – Unknown tune (25:13)
Song 18 – Unknown tune (26:05)
Song 19 – Unknown tune (28:40)
Song 20 – Unknown tune (29:54)
Song 21 – Unknown tune (31:05)
Song 22 – Unknown tune (31:32)
Song 23 – Unknown tune (32:35)
Song 24 – Unknown tune (36:30)
Song 25 – Unknown tune (37:55)
Song 26 – Unknown tune (39:15)
Song 27 – Unknown tune (40:25)
Song 28 – Unknown tune (41:51)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Fiddle
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
46:10
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Balfa Toujours at Augusta

Accession No.: 
TR2-016

Song 1 – Jeunes filles de la campagne (0:01)
Song 2 – Grand Mamou (4:20)
Song 3 – Blue Runner (8:00)
Song 4 – Capow One step/Reel de Fache (11:50)
Song 5 – Deux voyages (15:20)
Song 6 – The Kingpin Special (20:00)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Live
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Augusta, West Virginia
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
24:34
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

The Mamou Prairie Band at Randol's

Accession No.: 
TR2-017

Song 1 – Le two step à frisson (0:02)
Song 2 – Reno Waltz (3:45)
Song 3 – Johnny peut pas danser/ Johnny Can’t Dance (8:15)
Song 4 – Amédé Two Step (11:51)
Song 5 – Cette-la moi j’aime (15:30)
Song 6 – Highpoint Two Step (20:20)
Song 7 – J’aimerais connâitre (24:40)
Song 8 – J’étais au bal (29:20)
Song 9 – Les maringouins ont tout mangé ma belle (33:24)
Song 10 – Mon Nonc Charlot (36:50)
Song 11 – Zydeco Gris Gris (41:50)
Song 12 – Le Holiday (47:35)
Song 13 – Pour la dernière fois (52:45)
Song 14 – The Courville Toyota Two Step (57:40)
Song 15 – The Back Door (1:03:35)
Song 16 – La pistache a tante Na Na (1:08:00)
Song 17 – The Mamou Hot Step (1:11:55)
Song 18 – Unknown (1:15:50) *
Song 19 – The Rolling Pin (1:20:20)
Song 20 – It’s Lonesome In Prison (1:27:20)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Live
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Randal's, Lafayette
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:30:50
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Trahan Family Band. Harry Trahan (accordion and vocals), Mitch Reed (fiddle), Lisa Trahan (guitar), Willie-Tee Trahan (saxophone and vocals), and Rex Champagne (drums). One other unknown vocal.

Accession No.: 
TR2-018

Song 1 – Love Bridge Waltz (0:08)
Song 2 – La queue tortue (4:14) *
Song 3 – Cette-la moi j’aime (7:35)
Song 4 – Abbeville Two Step (10:38)
Song 5 – Zydeco Man (14:00)
Song 6 – Pine Grove Blues (17:37)
Song 7 – Chere Tout Tout (23:34)
Song 8 – Paper In My Shoe (27:45)
Song 9 – One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer (32:37)
Song 10 – ‘Tits yeux noirs (35:45)
Song 11 – Les maringouins ont tout mangé ma belle (40:20)
Song 12 – Dance de limonade (44:17)
Song 13 – Jolie Blonde (48:22)
Song 14 – J’ai fait mon idée (52:48)
Song 15 – Chere Mom (56:31)
Song 16 – Marais Buller (59:35)
Song 17 – ‘Tite robe courte/On va danser jitter bug (1:03:22)
Song 18 – The Back Door (1:07:45)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Hometape, Cajun
Creator: 
Lisa Trahan
Informants: 
Lisa Trahan
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Lisa Trahan
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:12:33
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

The Revon Reed Tapes: Canray Fontenot, Bois Sec Ardoin, Sady Courville, Nathan Abshire, Preston Manuel, Chuck Guillory, Isom Fontenot.

Accession No.: 
TR2-019

Song 1 – Allez-vous-en (0:07)
Song 2 – Unknown waltz (Amede Ardoin tune?) (2:10)
Song 3 – Mardi Gras Jig (5:50)
Song 4 – Isom Fontenot, Unknown (7:00)
Song 5 – Isom Fontenot, Unknown (8:55)
Song 6 – Revon Reed talking/Hicks Wagon Wheel Special (11:20)
Song 7 – Calcasieu Waltz, Nathan Abshire (17:10)
Song 8 – Popcorn Blues (23:07)
Song 9 – Unknown two step (26:00)
Song 10 – La valse qui m’fait du mal (28:30)
Song 11 – Tramp sur la roux (31:38)
Song 12 – Unknown song (35:54)
Song 13 – Madame Bosso (37:29)
Song 14 – When the Cactus Is in Bloom (38:37)
Song 15 – Chere mom (40:33)
Song 16 – Ta mama, m’a jeté dehors (42:22)
Song 17 – Rye Whiskey (44:12)
Song 18 – Chuck Guillory, The Kind of Love I Can’t Forget (46:36)
Song 19 – Your Cheatin’ Heart (48:56) *
Song 20 – The Waltz You Saved For Me (52:20)
Song 21 – Allons à Lafayette (55:49)
Song 22 – T’en a eu t’en auras plus (58:00)
Song 23 – San Antonio Rose (59:47)
Song 24 – Lake Arthur Stomp (1:03:15)
Song 25 – I Knew The Moment I Lost You (1:04:57)
Song 26 – In The Mood (1:07:47)
Song 27 – Evangeline Special (1:10:20)
Song 28 – Pauvre Hobo (1:12:16)
Song 29 – Tolam Waltz (1:14:30)
Song 30 – Unknown waltz (1:16:28)
Song 31 – Grand Texas (1:18:18)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Live, Radio, Talking
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Fred's Lounge, Mamou
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:21:08
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Calvin Carrière, Delton Broussard, JC Gallow

Accession No.: 
TR2-020

Song 1 – Unknown two step (0:01)
Song 2 – Unknown song (3:00)
Song 3 – Unknown song (7:02)
Song 4 – Unknown song (7:48)
Song 5 – Unknown waltz (11:53)
Song 6 – Unknown song (14:48)
Song 7 – Unknown song (17:38)
Song 8 – Unknown song (20:23)
Song 9 – Unknown waltz (22:22)
Song 10 – Unknown song (24:34)
Song 11 – Baby Please Don’t Go (27:23)
Song 12 – Unknown song, « j’etais au bal » (28:43)
Song 13 – La danse de limonade (30:52)
Song 14 – Unknown song (32:31)
Song 15 – Unknown song (35:36)
Song 16 – Unknown song (39:34)
Song 17 – Blues à bebe (43:29)
Song 18 – Blue Runner (46:38)
Song 19 – Unknown song (48:07)
Song 20 – Unknown song (51:23)
Song 21 – Unknown song (52:47)
Song 22 – Unknown song (53:20)
Song 23 – Unknown song (57:27)
Song 24 – Unknown song (1:00:08)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Creole, Hometape
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:02:31
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Tasso, Live in Atlanta

Accession No.: 
TR2-021

Song 1 – My robe is turned/ burned (0:35)
Song 2 – The Lacassine Special (4:09)
Song 3 – Le two-step de tête au vache (8:40)
Song 4 – La femme de la Louisiane (13:05)
Song 5 – La valse de Chataignier (17:10)
Song 6 – Attrape mon chapeau (22:10)
Song 7 – La jolie blonde (27:08)
Song 8 – Allons à Lafayette (31:55)
Song 9 – The 99 Year Waltz (39:45)
Song 10 – J’etais au bal (44:20)
Song 11 – Fee fee poncho (46:50)
Song 12 – Johnny peut pas danser (51:20)
Song 13 – Chere Aileen (56:40)
Song 14 – Petite ou la grosse (1:00:45)
Song 15 – Kaplan Waltz (1:04:55)
Song 16 – Choupique Two Step (1:09:20)
Song 17 – La valse du mexico (1:13:10)
Song 18 – The Twist/Tortier (1:17:00)
Song 19 – Pauvre Hobo (1:21:00)
Song 20 – La valse de l’arron (1:26:00)
Song 21 – Acadian Special (1:29:30)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Live
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Atlanta
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:33:01
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Les Bergerons

Accession No.: 
TR2-022

Song 1 – J’ai fait mon idée (0:01)
Song 2 – Quelle étoile (2:38)
Song 3 – New Country Waltz (5:10)
Song 4 – Perrodin Two Step (7:30)
Song 5 – Waltz of the Past (9:20)
Song 6 – French Rockin’ Boogie (11:50)
Song 7 – Chez Tanie (14:27)
Song 8 – Fais do do (16:50)
Song 9 – Old Home Waltz (19:15)
Song 10 – Madame Bozo (21:55)
Song 11 – La valse de la belle (24:10)
Song 12 – Mama et Papa (26:52)
Song 13 – J’ai passé devant ta porte (29:15)
Song 14 – Pauvre Hobo (31:40)
Song 15 – La valse d’August Breaux (34:05)
Song 16 – Eunice Two Step (36:22)
Song 17 – La valse de Cherokee (38:40)
Song 18 – Bosco Blues (41:00)
Song 19 – Madame Sosthène (43:45)
Song 20 – La crepe à Nazare (46:15)
Song 21 – Chere bassette (49:42)
Song 22 – Vermillion Two Step (52:22)
Song 23 – La valse de grand bois (54:40)
Song 24 – Chere Tout Tout (56:45)
*Switches to Fred’s Lounge Mamou Cajun Hour*
Song 25 – Lafayette two-step (59:10)
Song 26 – J’peux pas t’oublier/I Can’t Forget You (1:02:15)
Song 27 – Bosco Stomp (1:07:00)
Song 28 – La valse de famille (1:01:10)
Song 29 – Pine Grove Blues (1:12:05)
Song 30 – Grand Mamou (1:15:40)
Song 31 – The Perrodin Two Step (1:20:30)
Song 32 – Chere Tout Tout (1:22:40)
Song 33 – Lovebridge Waltz (1:25:20)
Song 34 – Hathaway Two Step (1:28:48)
Song 35 – Le chemin que t’as pris (1:31:55)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Album
Creator: 
Harry Trahan
Informants: 
Lisa Trahan
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Lisa Trahan
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:34:48
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Harry Trahan (accordion and vocals), Mitch Reed (fiddle), Lisa Trahan (guitar)

Accession No.: 
TR2-023

Song 1 – Valse de Reubin (0:12)
Song 2 – Calcasieu Waltz (3:40)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Hometape, Cajun
Creator: 
Harry Trahan
Informants: 
Lisa Trahan
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Lisa Trahan
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
6:46
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Storytelling with Hubert Reed and Craig Reed/Wade Frugé.

Accession No.: 
TR2-024

Talking and Storytelling (0:05)
The Sea Boat Story - (20:30)

*Switches to Wade Fruge, Mitch Reed, and two other unknown musicians*
Song 1 – Unknown fiddle tune, « crapeau two-step, chameaux two-step, shamrock » (22:54)
Song 2 – T’en a eu t’en auras plus (25:00)
Song 3 – Hicks Wagon Wheel Special (30:00)
Song 4 – Caillette est creve (31:40)
Song 5 – Unknown tune (goes into another unknown tune) (original?) (33:30) *
*Switches to Radio*
Song 6 – Unknown musician, Mon cœur cassé (38:55)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Storytelling, Hometape, Fiddle
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Saturday, November 2, 1991
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
40:22
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Thursday, March 21, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Clary Johnson

Accession No.: 
TR2-025

Song 1 – Taunt te bec a dou (0:05) *
Song 2 – Mamou Two Step (3:05)
Song 3 – Madame Sosthène (6:08)
Song 4 – Walker Special (8:52)
Song 5 – La valse de la campagne (11:35)
Song 6 – La valse qui m’fait du mal (14:50)
Song 7 – Wandering Aces Special (17:28)
Song 8 – ‘Tit monde (20:50)
Song 9 – Bosco Stomp (24:04)
Song 10 – La valse de Belizaire (26:45)
Song 11 – Les filles a Nonc Eliare (29:50)
Song 12 – Two step a malchanceux (32:44)
Song 13 – La valse de malchanceux (34:53)
Song 14 – Ossun Two Step (37:45)
Song 15 – Le tracs de mon buggy (40:35)
Song 16 – Johnny peut pas danser/Johnny Can’t Dance (43:35)
Song 17 – Midnight Waltz (47:35)
Song 18 –Creole Stomp (50:40)
Song 19 – La valse de Chataignier/Chataignier Waltz (54:05)
Song 20 – Perrodin Two Step (58:00)
Song 21 – Tolam Waltz (1:01:10)
Song 22 – Les flames d’enfer (1:05:36)
Song 23 – La valse de Cajun (1:09:20)
Song 24 – Choupique Two Step (1:13:05)
Song 25 – La valse criminelle/Criminal Waltz (1:15:45)
Song 26 – Flames d’enfer (1:23:45)
Song 27 – War Widow Waltz (1:27:20)
Song 28 – Wafus Two Step (1:30:20)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Hometape
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Monday, May 16, 1988
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:33:38
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Wednesday, March 27, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Mouton Noire. Mitch Reed (fiddle), Randy Vidrine (guitar and vocals), Corey McCauley (accordion)

Accession No.: 
TR2-026

Song 1 – Amédé Two Step (0:00)
Song 2 – The Lacasssine Special (3:30)
Song 3 – Valse de Kaplan (8:10)
Song 4 – Allons a la queue tortue (13:08)
Song 5 – Laissez les bon temps rouler (18:00)
Song 6 – The Drunkard’s Blues (22:10)
Song 7 – Jolie Catin (26:20)
Song 8 – Mon nonc Chalow (30:40)
Song 9 – You Had Some, But Now You Don’t (34:35)
Song 10 – Chere tits yeux noirs (39:30)
Song 11 – Blue Runner (44:20)
Song 12 – Ossun Two Step (46:38) *
Song 13 – Sur le courtableu (50:35)
Song 14 – J’aimerais connâitre (56:05)
Song 15 – Eunice Two-Step (1:00:35)
Song 16 – Hathaway Two-Step (1:06:00)
Song 17 – La pistache à tante NaNa (1:11:00)
Song 18 – La danse de limonade (1:14:42)
Song 19 – Reno Waltz (1:18:55)
Song 20 – Danse Carré (1:23:30)
Song 21 – The 99 Year Waltz (1:26:30)
Song 22 – Evangline Two Step (1:30:34)

Language: 
English
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Cajun, Live
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:33:05
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Monday, March 25, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Mountain Stage on American Public Radio/ KRVS.

Accession No.: 
TR2-027
Song 1 – Open Arms, Jerry Douglas, Maura O’Connell, and Russ Barenberg (0:00) Song 2 – Open Arms, Jerry Douglas, Maura O’Connell, and Russ Barenberg (5:00) Song 3 – Crazy Dreams, Jerry Douglas, Maura O’Connell, and Russ Barenberg (10:40) Song 4 – Home Is Where The Heart Is, Del McCoury and the Bluesgrass Experience with David Grisman (15:13) Song 5 – Little Georgia Rose, Del McCoury and the Bluegrass Experience (18:40) Song 6 – Sophronie, Del McCoury and the Bluegrass Experience (23:20) Song 7 – Unknown song, Del McCoury and the Bluegrass Experience (26:20) Song 8 – Somewhere Over the Rainbow, Dave Ferguson (30:20) Song 9 – Home From the Forest, Tony Rice (33:39) Song 10 – Heaven’s Bright Shore, Alison Krauss and Union Station (38:15) Song 11 –Love You In Vain, Alison Krauss and Union Station (41:22) Song 12 – Lady’s Fancy, Dan Crary (43:45) Song 13 – Kathy Barton, Satan Your Kingdom Must Come Down (50:50) Song 14 – Unknown song, unknown artist (55:33) Song 15 – Sitting On Top of the World, Seldom Scene (58:40) Song 16 – Big Train From Memphis, Seldom Scene (1:02:35) Song 17 – The Train That Carried My Girl From Town, Doc Watson (1:05:27) Song 18 – My Last Days on Earth, Bill Monroe (1:09:47) Song 19 – Roses In the Snow, Emmy-lou Harris (1:14:23) Song 20 – Wayfaring Stranger, Emmy-lou Harris (1:17:04) Song 21 – East Virginia Blues, JD Crow and the New South (1:20:35) Song 22 – Bugle Call Rag, JD Crow and the New South (1:23:10) Song 23 – You Don’t Know My Mind, JD Crow and the New South (1:27:30) Song 24 – Flint Hill Special, JD Crow and the New South (1:30:45) Song 25 – Free Boarding Man, Bill Monroe (1:34:00)
Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Live, Various
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Recording date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
1:38:28
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Monday, March 25, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

Copy of "Louisiana Cajun Music: The Legendary Moise Robin"

Accession No.: 
TR2-028

Song 1 – Le lapin heureux en d’dans son nid (1:00)
Song 2 – Moi j'me vois tout seul dedans c'pays, un abandonné (3:45)
Song 3 – Mon ‘tit yoyo (8:38)
Song 4 – Moi, j’veux une femme (12:45)
Song 5 – Chers beaux yeux de la Louisiane (16:55)
Song 6 – Le chien galeux (21:25)
Song 7 –Pauline a été en vacances (25:20)
Song 8 – Jealous Mind (29:45)
Song 9 – Les jolies filles de Courtableu (33:10)
Song 10 – Les écrevisses en d’dans la chaudière (37:40)
Song 11 – J'après brailler parmi les étrangers (41:15)
Song 12 – Sois honnête avec moi (45:05)

Language: 
French
Media Type: 
Audio
Collection: 
Trahan, Harry - Personal
Subject: 
Hometape, Cajun, Album
Creator: 
Mitch Reed
Informants: 
Mitch Reed
Coverage Spatial: 
Louisiana
Publisher: 
Center of Louisiana Studies, Mitch Reed
Rights Usage: 
All Rights Reserved
Meta Information
Duration: 
46:34
Cataloged Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Digitized Date: 
Monday, March 25, 2019
Original Format: 
Cassette
Digital Format: 
WAV
Bit Depth: 
24 bit
Sampling Rate: 
96 kHz
Storage Location: 
Returned to donor

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